The Collage Path:
Fragmentation

The mind is, inherently, a pluralistic society; a collage is, above all, a contained multiplicity. Hence it is not the action of isolated images, no matter how potent, that motivates the movement we will follow here; it is, rather, energies and tensions generated within multi-image fields that propel it.

Accordingly, the cultural background presumed by the Collage Path is the contemporary experience of over-stimulation and fragmentation: the experience of multiple elements proliferating, generating a surplus of feeling, becoming unmanageable.

Psychotherapy generally assumes that the patient’s ego must be exposed gradually and cautiously to the experience of divergent impulses and ideas, and, accordingly, the psychotherapeutic process begins with the notion of a presumed (even if defensive) unity.

The Collage Method works differently. The individual-developmental background presumed by the Collage Method is the infant’s experience of incohesion—the lack of a unified image of its own body or the surrounding world prior to the integration of the perceptual field: the body-in-pieces; the world a flicker of unstabilized appearances and vanishings. In this sense the Collage Path begins at the beginning. Fragmentation is the hallmark of the modern age, but it is also the point at which the human impulse toward form arises.

Fragmentation polylogue